Future interactions design: tapping the wisdom of the crowd

Preparing for the future

Preparing for the future

On April 3, I attended the Chi Sparks 2014 conference on human computer interaction, to present my paper on the Kids’ Knowledge Base. I also attended a highly interesting workshop on “Future Interactions”, hosted by Marco Rozendaal of  Delft University of Technology. His group is developing a method to let groups design scenarios of future interactions. As the workshop call stated:

Future Interactions’ focuses on emerging technologies (communication technology, nanotechnology etc.) that enrich our everyday lives and asks how they can be embodied in a meaningful way.

Design explores new horizons. How can design methods address promises and pitfalls of emerging technologies? How may these technologies transform our bodies, perceptions and behaviours?

The workshop participants were split in teams of two people.  We were first asked to select a couple of cardboard cards from a common pool, covering the main categories technologies, applications, and interactions

The cards to the future...

Our cards to the future…

Together with my “future buddy”, John Swarts, I selected the following cards:

  • [Technology: advanced manufacturing)] forever beta – “products that are never finished and always updated”
  • [Applications: professional] working life –  “performance, autonomy, and satisfaction”
  • [Applications: professional] lifelong learning – “lifelong learning, professionalism, and meta-learning”
  • [Interactions: society] politics – forms of political action

We chose these cards, as we believe the forever beta mode is the fundamental mode of the socio-technical design of society, involving all stakeholders as co-creators. That society is shaped by a working life in in which people are always learning from and with one another in networks and communities, without there being any stable knowledge hierarchies anymore. We added the political dimension, as we believe that such an informed, evolutionary, co-creative way of working & learning is not operating in a political vacuum, but should directly help shape the norms, values, and directions of the society of the future.

We then discussed how these cards could be merged into a “future design scenario”. Discussing a concrete case about innovation of elderly care, and inspired by the software design approach of “user-centered design”, we arrived at the idea of “society-centered design“. Such a concept would require much more than currently often the case a holistic multi-stakeholder approach to emergent, knowledge-driven ways of working and learning. This approach should be governed by _and_ frame the political framework in which these productive learning processes ought to take place. An early example of such society-centered design are the increasingly popular multi-stakeholder “living labs” sprouting everywhere, in which working concepts and political governance models for complex societal issues like care and education are being co-created by – ideally – all stakeholders involved.   

Evaluating the future

Evaluating the future

In the next step, all groups positioned their “draft concepts” on a large gameboard, the horizontal axis indicating how quickly a concept could be implemented (from “tomorrow” till the more distant future). Finally, each group made a 1-minute pitch for their concept, after which each participant could position a number of coins on the concepts (or their intersections) which they thought to be the most valuable and feasible (we were thrilled to see our “society-centered design”-concept to turn out to be one of the winners. We’re almost done with our accompanying future bestseller book 🙂 On a serious note: the popularity of this concept is another indicator that the time for the field of community informatics/communities & technologies has come, as they are all about societal sensemaking of the pros and cons of powerful (IC)Ts).

The Future Interaction design method reminds me very much of other pattern-based design methods, such as the Liberating Voices “pattern language for communication revolution” (see Ken Gillgren’s piece on “lifting every voice” for a great application of that language). The beauty of such socio-technical design methods is on the one hand the simplicity of their components and rules, and on the other hand, the endless ways in which these elements can be configured and used for scalable, intricate human sensemaking.  In the end, such methods are just catalysts, all the knowledge is in the heads of the participants. How to get that knowledge out of these heads and into socio-technical designs of politics, business, education, and every-day life & work is what such socio-technical sensemaking & design methods could help us accompish.

Though promising, there are still many open research questions on how to make these methods more effective, such as:

  • How to build rich sets of concepts/patterns/cards that are generic enough to be multi-purpose yet specific enough to trigger creative use?
  • How do such sets differ depending on their use, such as future interactions or “communication revolution” design?
  • What rules of the game help (1) elicit the most powerful configurations of patterns and (2) make sense of what these configurations mean?
  • How to document, share and disseminate the results?
  • How to enrich physical workshop sessions with digital preparatory and follow-up work?
  • How to make such insights actually influence policy-making and research?
To be continued in “future research”…

 

New publication: “It’s the Conversation, Stupid!” – Social Media Systems Design for Open Innovation Communities

130114_open innovation conversations

My joint book chapter with Mark Aakhus, “It’s the Conversation, Stupid!” Social Media Systems Design for Open Innovation Communities was just published in J.E. Lundström et al. (eds.), Managing Open Innovation Technologies, Springer, Berlin. ISBN 978-3-642-31649-4.

Abstract

Open innovation is about crossing boundaries to create networked synergies in/across collaborative communities. Conversations are the lifeblood of communities, building the common ground of shared meanings, beliefs, interests, norms, goals, trust and social capital. A fundamental challenge for open innovation lies in the successful crafting of the social media systems supporting the community conversations. Innovation communities (which are not limited to business interests but also include public and civic organizations and communities) therefore need to continuously make sense of the conversation context of the tools they use. We provide a conceptual lens with which to examine this socio-technical conversation context. We illustrate the use of this lens with a plausible scenario of open innovation in the societal stakeholder networks around climate change research.

De Tilburgse Spoorzone als “Laboratorium voor de Maatschappij van de Toekomst”

De Tilburgse Spoorzone (zie ook Co-Creatie Kerngebied Spoorzone, De:WerkplaatsSpoorzone site Brabants Dagblad en de Spoorzone Facebook groep) staat in het centrum van de belangstelling. Ruim 2,5 kilometer lang met een oppervlakte van 75 hectare ligt deze voormalige NS werkplaats bijna volledig braak, maar met een geweldige potentie in deze stad van creatievelingen, makers, doeners en denkers.

Spoorzone Tilburg

Het is de bedoeling dat de Spoorzone een “Kennis Plus Profiel” gaat krijgen.  Om dit in te vullen wordt onder meer gedacht aan het realiseren van een bibliotheek van de toekomst, een leer- en kennisomgeving en een “social innovation kenniscampus”. O.a. Fontys Hogescholen, Tilburg University en TiasNimbas worden hierbij betrokken. Fontys heeft onlangs bekend gemaakt over te gaan met haar opleidingen Creative Industries en Journalistiek, op weg naar een “campus 3.0”. Maar ook cultuur ontbreekt niet in deze mix, zo is als voorhoede de Hall of Fame sinds kort in dit gebied gehuisvest en wordt het gerenoveerde Deprez-gebouw al geruime tijd gebruikt als huisvesting voor maatschappelijke organisaties en voor het organiseren van allerlei presentaties, debatten en manifestaties. Koppel hier nog allerlei toekomstige bedrijvigheid van creatieve en  andere ondernemers aan en er is sprake van een uniek gebied dat op allerlei manieren kan gaan bruisen.

Hoewel de potentie enorm is, is de verwarring dat ook. Zoveel betrokkenen, zoveel belangen, zoveel mogelijke invullingen, zoveel tekorten… Hoe zo’n enorm gebied in te richten, zodanig dat het recht doet aan de diversiteit van alle belanghebbenden, maar dat er tegelijkertijd de verbinding tussen zoveel mogelijk bewoners wordt gelegd? Wat is de “eenheid in verscheidenheid”, wat is het “grote verhaal” dat verteld kan worden over dit gebied? Een verhaal wat Tilburg op de kaart zet, niet alleen provinciaal of nationaal, maar internationaal? Een verbindend idee dat ervoor zorgt dat mensen naar Tilburg willen komen om dit gebied met eigen ogen te zien en te beleven, maar ook om mee te doen, of in de taal van vandaag de dag, de Spoorzone te helpen “co-creëren”?

Vorig jaar vond er in Noord-Brabant een bijzonder interessante exercitie plaats, georganiseerd door BrabantBrein, om zoveel mogelijk concrete ideeën te verzamelen om te komen tot een letterlijk betere samenleving. In de hele provincie werden bijeenkomsten georganiseerd, waarin door een groot aantal teams ideeën werden gegenereerd, gepresenteerd, geselecteerd en steeds verder verfijnd. Een van de geselecteerde ideëen betrof het beschouwen van Noord-Brabant als laboratorium van de “Maatschappij van de Toekomst”:

Noord-Brabant als laboratorium van de “Maatschappij van de Toekomst” waarin volop wordt geëxperimenteerd met oplossingen voor complexe, organisatie-overstijgende problemen als vergrijzing, milieuvervuiling, integratie enz. Brabant heeft hiervoor uitstekende “faciliteiten”: een groot aantal verschillende stakeholders met veel verschillende expertise, een zeer gevarieerde economie, een informele cultuur, bereidheid tot samenwerken, enz. Geleerde lessen zouden vervolgens als voorbeeld kunnen dienen voor andere provincies en regio’s in Europa.

Ooit stond het “Huis van de Toekomst” in Rosmalen. Tilburg ligt in het hart van Midden-Brabant. De Spoorzone ligt in het centrum van Tilburg. Wat nu als we de Spoorzone (als “hart van het Hart van Brabant”) maken tot het provinciale “laboratorium voor de Maatschappij van de Toekomst”? Het betreft hier een speciaal soort laboratorium: een “living lab”. Een living lab is een ecosysteem van de private en de publieke sector, waarin het leggen van verbindingen en het aanjagen van innovatie centraal staat. Zo’n living lab gedachte sluit ook uitstekend aan op “social innovation” als het centrale thema van de regio Midden-Brabant, zoals deze reeds uitvoerig gestalte krijgt in het samenwerkingsverband Midpoint Brabant.

Vanuit deze gedachte bezien wordt de Spoorzone een enorm spannend ecosysteem van innovaties waar bedrijfsleven, overheid, onderwijs, culturele instellingen, creatieve ondernemers en burgers samen laten zien hoe onze maatschappij er over zoveel jaar uit zou kunnen en moeten zien. Technische en sociale innovaties, nieuwe kunst-, cultuur-, onderwijs- en onderzoeksconcepten, maatschappelijke scenario’s, een uitdijend web van steeds veranderende  en met elkaar verbonden ideëen waarmee de maatschappij van de toekomst wordt vormgegeven. Allerlei kruisbestuivingen van goede ideëen die plaatsvinden in gebouwen en installaties maar vooral ook door middel van nieuwe media, presentaties en debatten, workshops en conferenties, onderzoeksprojecten,  samenwerkingsverbanden tussen de meest onwaarschijnlijke partners, netwerken van overlappende communities…

Enkele voorbeelden van hoe die kruisbestuivingen eruit zouden kunnen zien:

  • Grote zorginstellingen als De Wever laten (samen met grote verzekeraars als Interpolis of CZ) in een tentoonstellingszaal zien hoe mantelzorgers en professionals om zouden kunnen gaan met mensen met dementie in de Dementie Experience. Ernaast wordt een congres voor verzekeraars en zorgverleners uit heel Europa gehouden in de Koepelhal over hoe deze innovatieve aanpakken een bijdrage zouden kunnen leveren aan het verbeteren van de levenskwaliteit en het terugdringen van de zorgkosten.
  • Studenten Journalistiek van Fontys werken samen met uitgeverijen als Zwijsen o.a. op basis van toekomstscenario’s van het Tilburg Social Innovation Lab aan het vertellen van het “Maatschappij van de Toekomst” verhaal in een digital storytelling project. In dit project worden allerlei crossmediale vormen uitgewerkt, o.a. bestaande uit een groot aantal installaties verspreid over het hele Spoorzone terrein, maar ook met digitale koppelingen naar gerelateerde projecten en discussiefora over de hele wereld. De “buzz” die daardoor ontstaat trekt weer allerlei bezoekers van heinde en verre naar het gebied.
  • Het Science Centre werkt samen met de Bibliotheek van de Toekomst en het Wetenschapsknooppunt Tilburg aan het ontwikkelen van digitale en fysieke leerlijnen om kinderen van de basisschoolleeftijd al te enthousiasmeren voor de wetenschap. Via een online “kinderkennisbank” bereiden kinderen uit de hele regio en zelfs de rest van het land zich voor op een lesthema om dan met het openbaar vervoer af te reizen naar de Spoorzone. Hier zien ze een hele dag wetenschap & techniek in actie in een “Exploratorium“-achtige setting in verschillende gebouwen in de Spoorzone.
  • Een consortium van bedrijven, kennisinstellingen en overheden, omgeven door een web van culturele instellingen en creatieve ZZP-ers gaan met elkaar een langdurig samenwerkingsverband aan om te komen tot een nationaal Master Plan om de vergrijzing in 2040 het hoofd te bieden. Het Master plan bestaat uit creatieve interpretaties van wat de effecten van vergrijzing op het dagelijks leven zullen zijn, maar ook ideëen voor heel praktische zorgproducten, voorstellen voor nieuwe zorgprocessen en innovatieve financieringsmodellen. Elk van deze partijen heeft een “ambassade” in de Spoorzone, variërend van een heel gebouw voor de grote organisaties tot een kamer in een verzamelgebouw voor een “community van senioren” die als ervaringsdeskundigen mee willen denken over wat er nodig is. Een vleugel van een van de (functioneel gerenoveerde) karakteristieke NS-gebouwen wordt door Seats2Meet ingericht als permanente “kruisbestuivingsruimte” waarin prototypes worden getoond, vergaderingen en presentaties worden gehouden en de vertegenwoordigers van alle betrokken partijen elkaar voortdurend op allerlei verrassende, inspirerende en informele wijze tegenkomen.

In ons recent verschenen artikel  “De openbare bibliotheek als stadslab” schetsen Emmeken van der Heijden en ikzelf een scenario voor hoe de bibliotheek van de toekomst eruit zou kunnen zien door het leggen van allerlei slimme verbindingen tussen de fysieke en online wereld. Cruciaal hierbij is dat in eerste instantie gekeken moet worden naar gewenste functies, verbindingen en interacties tussen allerlei (on)mogelijke partijen, samen met die partijen, voordat er geïnvesteerd wordt in fysieke infrastructuur. Voor de Spoorzone als geheel geldt dat zo mogelijk nog meer. Keuzes die nu gemaakt worden bepalen het innovatieve DNA van het gebied voor vele toekomstige generaties. Wordt de Spoorzone een gebied als zoveel andere kwakkelende stedelijke zones, met veel schitterende (en dure) gebouwen, maar veel te weinig leven en “vibe”? Of durven we echt hier met zijn allen samen iets neer te zetten wat Tilburg op de kaart zet bij de provincie, het land en Europa?

Natuurlijk moeten de enorme investeringen gedaan in de aankoop van de Spoorzone worden terugverdiend, zeker gezien de zware financiële tijden die de stad nu doormaakt. Het een hoeft het ander echter niet uit te sluiten. Een simpele voetgangerstunnel onder het station moet als “deur naar het gebied” zo spoedig mogelijk en tegen geringe kosten kunnen worden aangelegd. Veel bestaande gebouwen kunnen op sobere wijze worden gerenoveerd, zodat deze voldoen aan minimale functionele en veiligheidseisen.  Als ze zich nieuwbouw (nog) niet kunnen veroorloven, kunnen speciale contractvormen mogelijke bewoners (van ZZP-ers tot grote organisaties) aantrekken om in die gebouwen een tijdelijke “innovatie-ambassade” te openen. Op deze manier begint ongebruikt terrein al op korte termijn inkomsten te genereren voor de gemeente en kunnen de pioniers per direct beginnen het living lab ecosysteem te ontwikkelen. Tevens wordt zo tijd gewonnen om tot goed afgewogen plannen te komen in een transparent proces van consultatie, samen met huidige en toekomstige belanghebbenden en bewoners van het gebied, met projectontwikkelaars en gemeente, met mee- en tegendenkers, offline en online.

Tilburg heeft zichzelf al vele malen opnieuw uitgevonden. We hebben nu nog de  kans om iets groots te realiseren. Laten we die kans grijpen.

PS: Oorspronkelijk heette deze blog “De Tilburgse Spoorzone als “Living Lab voor de Maatschappij van de Toekomst”. “Living lab” is echter jargon dat gebruikt kan (en moet) worden in beleidsstukken, omdat het een specifiek soort (sociaal-maatschappelijk i.p.v. een technisch) laboratorium betreft. Om het idee duidelijk te maken aan de gemiddelde leek, is het naar mijn mening beter om gewoon de term “laboratorium” te gebruiken. Zo kan het verhaal beter verteld worden en blijven hangen.

“It’s the Conversation, Stupid!” – Social media systems design for open innovation communities

On November 5, the Swedish Open Innovation Forum organized a “Managing Open Innovation Technologies” workshop at Uppsala University, to present and discuss state-of-the-art research insights into open innovation & social media and for authors working on an anthology on this topic to get feedback on their draft chapters. It was a very lively meeting, generating lots of ideas for new research. Concluding, it was clear there’s still a very long way to go for social media to realize their full potential in this domain.

At the workshop, I gave a keynote on social media systems design for open innovation communities:

After that, my good friend and co-author Mark Aakhus (Rutgers University, USA), reflected upon what I said.  Mark wasn’t physically present, but participated from his study at his home in New Jersey, 6000 km away. Of course, I have been in many videoconferencing sessions, but normally these are cumbersome events, requiring lots of high tech, special rooms, microphones, cameras and what not. However, this time none of this was needed. All we used was a Mac and Skype. As Mark was presenting, he was displayed larger-than-life on the main screen using the projector:

Mark Aakhus presenting

Reception was crystal clear, he could hear everything being said, even in the back of the room. Things really got weird after he was finished.  The laptop was left on the table, and Mark’s image removed from the screen when other people used it to present their Powerpoints. However, once in a while, suddenly, the laptop started speaking, as Mark commented on something being said. The funny thing was that we all quickly got used to that situation, looking at and talking to a laptop as if it were a human being. Still, sometimes, Mark/the laptop would suddenly make a sound, and the whole flow of the conversation was disrupted, nobody quite sure what to make of it. A very strange and powerful experience of, literally, “extreme computer-mediated communication”!