New publication: The “Kids’ Knowledge Base”: Connecting Junior Science to Society

Just published: A. de Moor  (2014), The “Kids’ Knowledge Base”: Connecting Junior Science to Society. In Proc. of Chi Sparks 2014, The Hague, the Netherlands. The Hague University of Applied Sciences, pp.108-111.

Abstract

Universities try to reinforce their connections with society in many different ways. Introducing children to science at an early age is an important part of this mission. The online “Kids’ Knowledge Base” is a key instrument for presenting showcases of various scientific fields to primary school children, thereby aiming to pique their curiosity. We outline the architecture and development process of the Kids’ Knowledge Base, and describe how it is increasingly being embedded in an ecosystem of online and physical tools, stakeholder networks, and activities. We show how it has been used since its launch in March 2013, and discuss how combining different modes of offline and online interaction helps to promote its overall usefulness and use. We discuss some applications and extensions of the current digital infrastructure and how these may help increase the quality and quantity of the online interactions with the knowledge base.

See also: Kids’ Knowledge Base, B@ttleweters.

New publication: Public Libraries as Social Innovation Catalysts

Just published: A. de Moor and R. van den Assem (2013), Public Libraries as Social Innovation Catalysts. In Proc. of the 10th Prato CIRN Conference “Nexus, Confluence, and Difference: Community Archives meets Community Informatics”, Prato, Italy, Oct 28-30 2013.

Abstract

Public libraries urgently need to reinvent their role in society. Through social innovation, libraries may adopt new functions and roles and even act as innovation catalysts in networks of increasingly interdependent stakeholders from different sectors. We investigate how to design such inter-sectoral public library innovations that are embedded in existing organizational practice and are both sustainable and scalable.  We outline a practical social innovation sensemaking method based on a combination of a social innovation collaboration network model and process model. We show how we did an initial validation of the method using the results of two exploratory workshops with professionals in the Dutch public library world. We discuss the implications of this approach for expanding the role of public libraries from providing access to collections to becoming social innovation and community catalysts.

Aside

Een social innovation ecosysteem voor Midden-Brabant

social innovation ecosysteemOp 16 september is er in het kader van de European Social Innovation Week een bijeenkomst gehouden over Midden-Brabant als “smart region”.  Een onderdeel van deze bijeenkomst was een discussie onder leiding van Hans Mommaas over hoe dat social innovation ecosysteem handen en voeten zou kunnen krijgen. Hier een informeel verslag voor degenen die niet bij deze bijzonder interessante discussie konden zijn.

Centrale vraag: hoe krijgen we een social innovation ecosysteem van de grond in de regio? Een voorbeeld zijn de Pathfinders.  In organisaties heb je de bestaande werkelijkheid en de exploratieve kant, die van de vernieuwing. “Transition leaders” zijn mensen die de mensen in hun organisatie kunnen meekrijgen voor die vernieuwing.  Ook die leaders hebben echter weer inspiratie nodig. In de  Pathfinders zijn 30 mensen bij elkaar gebracht uit organisaties die willen vernieuwen, met social innovation als uitgangspunt.  Doel was om de maatschappelijke thema’s door te vertalen naar oplossingen waar zowel de maatschappij als de organisaties wat mee kunnen. Ze zijn 15x bij elkaar geweest.  Een praktische doelstellng was om tot concrete business cases te komen.  De ervaring leerde echter dat zulke concrete cases moeilijk te realiseren waren. Wat wel werkte, was de aanwezige “ruimte voor toevalligheid”.  Het gaat hierbij niet zozeer om het geld, maar vooral om de beweging (de kennis, de netwerken, etc.). Het gaat om de ruil van andere types kapitaal dan alleen geld door de deelnemers uit sectoren als bedrijfsleven, kennisinstellingen, overheid, bibliotheek.  Denk ook aan de overeenkomst met de (her)opkomst van de coöperaties, waar het ook gaat om het gevoel van verbinding.

In de huidige maatschappij hebben we middel en doel omgedraaid: we denken dat we geld nodig hebben om samen te werken, het is een doel op zichzelf geworden.  Het geeft zoveel energie om gelijkgestemden tegen te komen in fora als de Pathfinders. Er ontstaat wel business uit, maar niet met als direct doel om geld te verdienen, maar om iets bij te dragen aan de maatschappij.  De kracht van de Pathfinders is dat het om social innovation in de praktijk gaat (“we moeten elkaars taal leren”), terwijl het tot voor kort het vaak nog steeds een erg bestuurlijk, abstract concept was.  Zo’n aanpak leidt tot allerlei verrassende, onvoorspelbare uitkomsten. De Social Innovation Week is mede voortgekomen uit de Pathfinders. Als onderdeel van deze week zijn nu 135 studenten van Fontys bezig met “Maak TIlburg Beter”. Wat daar de commerciële waarde van is, weten we niet, maar dat er iets uit gaat komen, is zeker!

Hoe maak je dit strategisch/systemisch, hoe schaal je dit op, zonder dat je de opgewekte energie verliest? Hierbij komen allerlei vragen op. Hoe verbind je lokale initiatieven met het bestuurlijke circuit?  Ook zijn er allerlei grote ontwikkelingen zoals social media die op mensen af komen. Wat betekenen deze ontwikkelingen voor de mensen persoonlijk?  Is bij social innovation sturing nodig, of gaat het juist om zelf de agenda te bepalen? Is het toch mogelijk om iets van structuur hebben om dit te catalyseren?

Continue reading

Collaboration Patterns for Social Innovation: The Dutch – US Connection?

As part of my visit to the  University of Alabama in Huntsville I gave a presentation “Creativity Meets Rationale – Collaboration Patterns for Social Innovation” at the College of Business Administration. It was based on the book chapter with the same title that was published earlier this year in the book “Creativity and Rationale: Enhancing Human Experience by Design”. The slides can be downloaded here.

From the discussion, it seemed that Europe is ahead in implementing scaled applications of social innovation,  although the US is catching up and making it a national priority as well, as indicated by the White House having created an Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation.  See also the Economist article Let’s Hear Those Ideas. It would be interesting to see to what extent collaboration patterns for social innovation are alike and differ in the US and European contexts. As Huntsville has an incredible wealth of high-tech engineering knowledge seeking new applications, it would be a very worthwhile exercise to build and compare libraries of collaboration patterns in the Dutch Noord-Brabant and US Alabama cases. A common theme to investigate could be civil aerospace applications, for instance.

Expanding the Academic Research Community: Building Bridges into Society with the Internet

Below the slides of the honors lecture I just gave at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The slides can be downloaded here.

The talk is based on a book chapter with the same title that will be published by Monash University Publishing in the fall.  A preprint of this chapter can be downloaded here. Thanks to the students for all your great questions. If there’s any more, feel free to post them here as comments.

New publication: Improving Communication for Collaboration in Social Innovation Projects – A Framework for Pragmatic Research

Just published: H. Weigand and A. de Moor (2013), Improving Communication for Collaboration in Social Innovation Projects – A Framework for Pragmatic Research. In Proc. of the 2nd international SIGPrag Workshop on IT Artefact Design and Workpractice Improvement (ADWI-2013), June 5, 2013, Tilburg, the Netherlands.

 

adwi

 

Abstract

Nowadays, many innovation projects are based on the collaboration of multiple parties to co-create value. Communication is a critical success factor. This paper introduces a pragmatic research framework that aims to improve communication practices in innovation projects. The framework draws on a revised Theory of Communicative Action in which the boundaries between spheres are explicitly acknowledged, as well as Bourdieu’s practice concept and the theory of boundary spanning. In this way, justice can be done to the many different communities that are involved in social innovation and the various ways they interact.

Social Innovation Meetup: “Exploring Labs for Social Change” – presentation notes

130425_Social Innovation MeetupOn April 25, Social Innovation Meetup #4, organized by Hivos and Kennisland, was held in Amsterdam. Theme: “Exploring Labs for Social Change”.  Social innovation labs are very popular as instruments for “changing the system”. However, what actually happens in these labs? How do they help accomplish social change? What’s in “the black box”?

Keynote speakers sharing innovation stories from Kenya, Finland, and Canada were Daudi Were of Ushahidi, Marco Steinberg of the Helsinki Design Lab and Vanessa Timmer of One Earth. In the two days prior to the meetup, representatives of living labs (hubs, experimental learning spaces, etc.) from all over the world gathered in “Lab2“.  Together, these people in the vanguard explored new examples and solutions for system change, some of which were reported at the meetup.  There was also supposed to be a panel discussion to see how their lessons learnt might apply to the Dutch context, but unfortunately that part was cancelled.
The presentations were brief and intense, relaying a flurry of interesting ideas and references. Like at the “Designing Social Cities of Tomorrow” workshop last year, I took presentation notes. They are rough, and only minimally edited, although I have added some links and excerpts from the sites linked to. Together, I think these notes give a nice overview of the many dimensions experienced at the international front lines of real social innovation.
Introduction 
A brief introductory speech was given by Remco Berkhout of Hivos.  There are many tough global problems, like climate change, for which there are no clearcut solutions. Hivos believes that citizen action is key to addressing these problems. People from all over the world are involved in such processes of social innovation. There are many interpretations of what is social innnovation: any idea that makes the world better, creativity of communities to make things better, popukar participation, with resources going to the communities, and so on. The silos need to go. Cities in the south can be great sources of inspiration. Given the pressing problems, labs there are often much more advanced than here in the West!
Daude Were (Ushahidi, Kenya)
In 2007, all hell broke loose after the Kenyan elections, resulting in many riots and murders. Many stories were un(der)reported. We needed to find stories of what was happening, curate them, map them, and archive them. Ushahidi was born, very quickly, in a couple of days. Ushahidi means “witness” or “testimony”. It really is a platform + community + movement.  The basic idea: from people in need to people who help. Does it work? Yes, it’s use has spread way beyond Kenya,  e.g. during the Haiti earthquake  and the Japanese tsunami the platform was used as an emergency platform. By now, it has got many other uses, including mapping harassments, oil spills, social revolutions (Arab Spring, Occupy), and monitoring elections (Tanzania and Zambia), mapping the different reasons why people voted in the Canadian elections, and so on. It is changing the way info flows in the world. How? We meet you where you are (in creating a great diversity of interfaces for sending to and receiving info from the platform). Both high-end applications (for decision makers) and low-end applications (to reach the masses) are important. In an emergency, you can have it set  up in only a few minutes (via crowdmap.com). It’s “Made in Africa”: “if it works here, it will work anywhere in the world :-)”.
We created iHub. Nairobi’s Innovation Hub for the technology community is an open space for the technologists, investors, tech companies and hackers in the area. This space is a tech community facility with a focus on young entrepreneurs, web and mobile phone programmers, designers and researchers.  It is a place to physically meet, partner up, share ideas, get exposure and support. We have over 9,000 members. It’s much more than just another cybercafe: over 40 companies have come out of it in the past few years.  We also have a number of initiatives designed to build an ecosystem around the Kenyan tech entrepreneur: Hub Research, iHub Consulting, iHub Supercomputing Cluster, and the iHub User Experience (UX) Lab. iHubs are started all over the country.

Continue reading

New publication: Creativity Meets Rationale – Collaboration Patterns for Social Innovation

collaboration pattern

My book chapter “Creativity Meets Rationale – Collaboration Patterns for Social Innovation” was recently published in J. Carroll (ed.), Creativity and Rationale: Enhancing Human Experience by Design, Springer, Berlin. ISBN 978-1-4471-4110-5.

Abstract

Collaborative communities require a wide range of face-to-face and online communication tools. Their socio-technical systems continuously grow, driven by evolving stakeholder requirements and newly available technologies. Designing tool systems that (continue to) match authentic community needs is not trivial. Collaboration patterns can help community members specify customized systems that capture their unique requirements, while reusing lessons learnt by other communnities. Such patterns are an excellent example of combining the strengths of creativity and rationale. In this chapter, we explore the role that collaboration patterns can play in designing the socio-technical infrastructure for collaborative communities. We do so via a cross-case analysis of three Dutch social innovation communities simultaneously being set-up. Our goal with this case study is two-fold: (1) understanding what social innovation is from a socio-technical lens and (2) exploring how the rationale of collaboration patterns can be used to develop creative socio-technical solutions for working communities.

“Designing Social Cities of Tomorrow” workshop – presentation notes

On February 17, the international  “Social Cities of Tomorrow” conference was held in Amsterdam. Prior to this conference, a three-day “Designing Social Cities of Tomorrow” workshop was held in which international participants from various professional backgrounds collaborated with local stakeholder organisations on 4 real-world urban cases: Urban Pioneers Zeeburgereiland (Amsterdam), Haagse Havens (The Hague), Strijp-S (Eindhoven), and Amsterdam Civic Innovator Network. On February 16, the results of this workshop were presented in a sold-out hall. Fortunately, I managed to get one of the last tickets. I was particularly interested in this workshop, as I thought it might generate some concrete ideas to help us co-create the new Tilburg Spoorzone. I was not disappointed, and really very pleased with the overall quality, originality, and feasibility of the ideas.

For the first three cases, quite detailed “how to do it” plans were unfolded, the presentation of the fourth case focused on the theoretical underpinnings of a civic innovator network. A good summary by Laurent Hubeek of the presentations  of case 1 & 2 can be found here, that of case 3 & 4 here. I took detailed notes during the case presentations. They’re rather rough, but I include them here to capture the atmosphere and as an additional recording of the insights presented. Hopefully they help to inspire further thinking.


Introduction

Hi-tech is increasingly influencing life in today’s cities.  “Smart Cities” are hot.  The main problem with these visions: where are the people?! Can we use the same hi-tech to make the cities more social instead of (just) smart? The key question therefore is:  How can we use digital technologies to make our cities more social, rather than just more hi-tech?
Social cities: it’s not about a blueprint, but a design approach. It’s a way of thinking about cities that are highly technological, but which is not about the technology itself,  but about the people. Now,  how do you design for social cities? How do you engage and empower publics (groups of people) to act on communally shared issues?
The digital element leads to a qualitative shift:
  • There’s a new resource: the data the city is generating
  • Name issues in new ways, discover patterns, bring up/visualize new issues in ways you couldn’t do before
  • Engage people, give them a new sense of place (e.g. storytelling, urban gaming)
  • Ways how we organize ourselves: peer-to-peer organization around issues

Taking this into account, the questions posed to the teams were:

  • How can we get citizens to feel they belong and feel that the city belongs to them as well?
  • How do we design for ‘ownership’?
Case 1: TEMPLoT (= temporary plot)
 
Municipalities are plagued by having many unused vacant parcels.  Zeeburgereiland Amsterdam is a typical case. However, most of Europe is dealing with same issues. Key idea: “temporary” could become the stimulus.
Nothing is happening on Zeeburgereiland, it is literally a no go zone. The city idea was to make it available as a 10 year-lease for 1 euro. Why not make it much more temporary:  what  if the urban pioneer was only given the land for 365 days instead of 10 years? The temp architecture initiative wants experts to meet some place to advise new urban pioneers to do something “tomorrow”. These expert roles are: owner, developer, designer, manager. However, what if the urban pioneers are the experts? Individuals could start playing those roles themselves. To do so, maybe these urban pioneers don’t need a place but a platform? This system consisting of a website plus apps could be TEMPLoT.
Zeeburgereiland = 3,6 ha plot minus 15% infrastructure. Possible uses: Recreation? Entertainment, Amusement, Do Nothing? As the area is sandwiched between superdense neighbourhoods: what if its main use were a garden? It could provide a temp infrastructure consisting of private parcels, plus an area for a larger community “Contribution Zone”. Flex spaces  would be adjacent to private spaces, which can help in the building of mini communities. Manage the collective usage online via TEMPLoT.
Follow the seasonal life cycle: in December, start planning the temp infrastructure, in January, do the bidding process, after that the building and planting etc., use summer for enjoying festivals, then in October/November, do the clean up process. Coordination can happen online. The flex space is the negotiation space (through bidding) between the neighbours. Contribution zone: everybody has to contribute something there (time, energy, skills & knowledge, teaching, network, etc.). These contributions are visible in your online profile, so your neighbors know your involvement. Potential individual uses: relaxation, family plot, artist studio, etc.
 
Stakeholder organization response:
 
It for sure is possible. It could become a way of “citymaking”. Should not only be gardens, however, the area could also be used in another way. A potential problem is that  people like it so much that they don’t want to leave? Also, the app used in the plotting process should be simple. What if it would also allow pioneers to change plot? Would be great if it could also help to increase the skills of participants.
Impressed by the “back to basics” approach. This is refreshing, as city design has become so (unnecessarily) complex these days. Nice it’s so hands-on.
Commitment:  the tender for Zeeburgereiland is already out, we could add this digital approach. Every city in Europe has such a map of vacant plots. Many other cities could also apply this approach: investigate how other cities can be involved?
 
Audience response: 
 
There’s a similar project in Ghent, Belgium. It’s about gardens, people could buy it with invented city currency, so that everybody could afford a plot, also those without money. You put in your effort and got the virtual currency. However, what was the duration of the lease? The temp focus is very important.
 

Continue reading

De Tilburgse Spoorzone als “Laboratorium voor de Maatschappij van de Toekomst”

De Tilburgse Spoorzone (zie ook Co-Creatie Kerngebied Spoorzone, De:WerkplaatsSpoorzone site Brabants Dagblad en de Spoorzone Facebook groep) staat in het centrum van de belangstelling. Ruim 2,5 kilometer lang met een oppervlakte van 75 hectare ligt deze voormalige NS werkplaats bijna volledig braak, maar met een geweldige potentie in deze stad van creatievelingen, makers, doeners en denkers.

Spoorzone Tilburg

Het is de bedoeling dat de Spoorzone een “Kennis Plus Profiel” gaat krijgen.  Om dit in te vullen wordt onder meer gedacht aan het realiseren van een bibliotheek van de toekomst, een leer- en kennisomgeving en een “social innovation kenniscampus”. O.a. Fontys Hogescholen, Tilburg University en TiasNimbas worden hierbij betrokken. Fontys heeft onlangs bekend gemaakt over te gaan met haar opleidingen Creative Industries en Journalistiek, op weg naar een “campus 3.0″. Maar ook cultuur ontbreekt niet in deze mix, zo is als voorhoede de Hall of Fame sinds kort in dit gebied gehuisvest en wordt het gerenoveerde Deprez-gebouw al geruime tijd gebruikt als huisvesting voor maatschappelijke organisaties en voor het organiseren van allerlei presentaties, debatten en manifestaties. Koppel hier nog allerlei toekomstige bedrijvigheid van creatieve en  andere ondernemers aan en er is sprake van een uniek gebied dat op allerlei manieren kan gaan bruisen.

Hoewel de potentie enorm is, is de verwarring dat ook. Zoveel betrokkenen, zoveel belangen, zoveel mogelijke invullingen, zoveel tekorten… Hoe zo’n enorm gebied in te richten, zodanig dat het recht doet aan de diversiteit van alle belanghebbenden, maar dat er tegelijkertijd de verbinding tussen zoveel mogelijk bewoners wordt gelegd? Wat is de “eenheid in verscheidenheid”, wat is het “grote verhaal” dat verteld kan worden over dit gebied? Een verhaal wat Tilburg op de kaart zet, niet alleen provinciaal of nationaal, maar internationaal? Een verbindend idee dat ervoor zorgt dat mensen naar Tilburg willen komen om dit gebied met eigen ogen te zien en te beleven, maar ook om mee te doen, of in de taal van vandaag de dag, de Spoorzone te helpen “co-creëren”?

Vorig jaar vond er in Noord-Brabant een bijzonder interessante exercitie plaats, georganiseerd door BrabantBrein, om zoveel mogelijk concrete ideeën te verzamelen om te komen tot een letterlijk betere samenleving. In de hele provincie werden bijeenkomsten georganiseerd, waarin door een groot aantal teams ideeën werden gegenereerd, gepresenteerd, geselecteerd en steeds verder verfijnd. Een van de geselecteerde ideëen betrof het beschouwen van Noord-Brabant als laboratorium van de “Maatschappij van de Toekomst”:

Noord-Brabant als laboratorium van de “Maatschappij van de Toekomst” waarin volop wordt geëxperimenteerd met oplossingen voor complexe, organisatie-overstijgende problemen als vergrijzing, milieuvervuiling, integratie enz. Brabant heeft hiervoor uitstekende “faciliteiten”: een groot aantal verschillende stakeholders met veel verschillende expertise, een zeer gevarieerde economie, een informele cultuur, bereidheid tot samenwerken, enz. Geleerde lessen zouden vervolgens als voorbeeld kunnen dienen voor andere provincies en regio’s in Europa.

Ooit stond het “Huis van de Toekomst” in Rosmalen. Tilburg ligt in het hart van Midden-Brabant. De Spoorzone ligt in het centrum van Tilburg. Wat nu als we de Spoorzone (als “hart van het Hart van Brabant”) maken tot het provinciale “laboratorium voor de Maatschappij van de Toekomst”? Het betreft hier een speciaal soort laboratorium: een “living lab”. Een living lab is een ecosysteem van de private en de publieke sector, waarin het leggen van verbindingen en het aanjagen van innovatie centraal staat. Zo’n living lab gedachte sluit ook uitstekend aan op “social innovation” als het centrale thema van de regio Midden-Brabant, zoals deze reeds uitvoerig gestalte krijgt in het samenwerkingsverband Midpoint Brabant.

Vanuit deze gedachte bezien wordt de Spoorzone een enorm spannend ecosysteem van innovaties waar bedrijfsleven, overheid, onderwijs, culturele instellingen, creatieve ondernemers en burgers samen laten zien hoe onze maatschappij er over zoveel jaar uit zou kunnen en moeten zien. Technische en sociale innovaties, nieuwe kunst-, cultuur-, onderwijs- en onderzoeksconcepten, maatschappelijke scenario’s, een uitdijend web van steeds veranderende  en met elkaar verbonden ideëen waarmee de maatschappij van de toekomst wordt vormgegeven. Allerlei kruisbestuivingen van goede ideëen die plaatsvinden in gebouwen en installaties maar vooral ook door middel van nieuwe media, presentaties en debatten, workshops en conferenties, onderzoeksprojecten,  samenwerkingsverbanden tussen de meest onwaarschijnlijke partners, netwerken van overlappende communities…

Enkele voorbeelden van hoe die kruisbestuivingen eruit zouden kunnen zien:

  • Grote zorginstellingen als De Wever laten (samen met grote verzekeraars als Interpolis of CZ) in een tentoonstellingszaal zien hoe mantelzorgers en professionals om zouden kunnen gaan met mensen met dementie in de Dementie Experience. Ernaast wordt een congres voor verzekeraars en zorgverleners uit heel Europa gehouden in de Koepelhal over hoe deze innovatieve aanpakken een bijdrage zouden kunnen leveren aan het verbeteren van de levenskwaliteit en het terugdringen van de zorgkosten.
  • Studenten Journalistiek van Fontys werken samen met uitgeverijen als Zwijsen o.a. op basis van toekomstscenario’s van het Tilburg Social Innovation Lab aan het vertellen van het “Maatschappij van de Toekomst” verhaal in een digital storytelling project. In dit project worden allerlei crossmediale vormen uitgewerkt, o.a. bestaande uit een groot aantal installaties verspreid over het hele Spoorzone terrein, maar ook met digitale koppelingen naar gerelateerde projecten en discussiefora over de hele wereld. De “buzz” die daardoor ontstaat trekt weer allerlei bezoekers van heinde en verre naar het gebied.
  • Het Science Centre werkt samen met de Bibliotheek van de Toekomst en het Wetenschapsknooppunt Tilburg aan het ontwikkelen van digitale en fysieke leerlijnen om kinderen van de basisschoolleeftijd al te enthousiasmeren voor de wetenschap. Via een online “kinderkennisbank” bereiden kinderen uit de hele regio en zelfs de rest van het land zich voor op een lesthema om dan met het openbaar vervoer af te reizen naar de Spoorzone. Hier zien ze een hele dag wetenschap & techniek in actie in een “Exploratorium“-achtige setting in verschillende gebouwen in de Spoorzone.
  • Een consortium van bedrijven, kennisinstellingen en overheden, omgeven door een web van culturele instellingen en creatieve ZZP-ers gaan met elkaar een langdurig samenwerkingsverband aan om te komen tot een nationaal Master Plan om de vergrijzing in 2040 het hoofd te bieden. Het Master plan bestaat uit creatieve interpretaties van wat de effecten van vergrijzing op het dagelijks leven zullen zijn, maar ook ideëen voor heel praktische zorgproducten, voorstellen voor nieuwe zorgprocessen en innovatieve financieringsmodellen. Elk van deze partijen heeft een “ambassade” in de Spoorzone, variërend van een heel gebouw voor de grote organisaties tot een kamer in een verzamelgebouw voor een “community van senioren” die als ervaringsdeskundigen mee willen denken over wat er nodig is. Een vleugel van een van de (functioneel gerenoveerde) karakteristieke NS-gebouwen wordt door Seats2Meet ingericht als permanente “kruisbestuivingsruimte” waarin prototypes worden getoond, vergaderingen en presentaties worden gehouden en de vertegenwoordigers van alle betrokken partijen elkaar voortdurend op allerlei verrassende, inspirerende en informele wijze tegenkomen.

In ons recent verschenen artikel  “De openbare bibliotheek als stadslab” schetsen Emmeken van der Heijden en ikzelf een scenario voor hoe de bibliotheek van de toekomst eruit zou kunnen zien door het leggen van allerlei slimme verbindingen tussen de fysieke en online wereld. Cruciaal hierbij is dat in eerste instantie gekeken moet worden naar gewenste functies, verbindingen en interacties tussen allerlei (on)mogelijke partijen, samen met die partijen, voordat er geïnvesteerd wordt in fysieke infrastructuur. Voor de Spoorzone als geheel geldt dat zo mogelijk nog meer. Keuzes die nu gemaakt worden bepalen het innovatieve DNA van het gebied voor vele toekomstige generaties. Wordt de Spoorzone een gebied als zoveel andere kwakkelende stedelijke zones, met veel schitterende (en dure) gebouwen, maar veel te weinig leven en “vibe”? Of durven we echt hier met zijn allen samen iets neer te zetten wat Tilburg op de kaart zet bij de provincie, het land en Europa?

Natuurlijk moeten de enorme investeringen gedaan in de aankoop van de Spoorzone worden terugverdiend, zeker gezien de zware financiële tijden die de stad nu doormaakt. Het een hoeft het ander echter niet uit te sluiten. Een simpele voetgangerstunnel onder het station moet als “deur naar het gebied” zo spoedig mogelijk en tegen geringe kosten kunnen worden aangelegd. Veel bestaande gebouwen kunnen op sobere wijze worden gerenoveerd, zodat deze voldoen aan minimale functionele en veiligheidseisen.  Als ze zich nieuwbouw (nog) niet kunnen veroorloven, kunnen speciale contractvormen mogelijke bewoners (van ZZP-ers tot grote organisaties) aantrekken om in die gebouwen een tijdelijke “innovatie-ambassade” te openen. Op deze manier begint ongebruikt terrein al op korte termijn inkomsten te genereren voor de gemeente en kunnen de pioniers per direct beginnen het living lab ecosysteem te ontwikkelen. Tevens wordt zo tijd gewonnen om tot goed afgewogen plannen te komen in een transparent proces van consultatie, samen met huidige en toekomstige belanghebbenden en bewoners van het gebied, met projectontwikkelaars en gemeente, met mee- en tegendenkers, offline en online.

Tilburg heeft zichzelf al vele malen opnieuw uitgevonden. We hebben nu nog de  kans om iets groots te realiseren. Laten we die kans grijpen.

PS: Oorspronkelijk heette deze blog “De Tilburgse Spoorzone als “Living Lab voor de Maatschappij van de Toekomst”. “Living lab” is echter jargon dat gebruikt kan (en moet) worden in beleidsstukken, omdat het een specifiek soort (sociaal-maatschappelijk i.p.v. een technisch) laboratorium betreft. Om het idee duidelijk te maken aan de gemiddelde leek, is het naar mijn mening beter om gewoon de term “laboratorium” te gebruiken. Zo kan het verhaal beter verteld worden en blijven hangen.