New publication – Community Digital Storytelling for Collective Intelligence: towards a Storytelling Cycle of Trust

S. Copeland and A. de Moor (2017). Community Digital Storytelling for Collective Intelligence: towards a Storytelling Cycle of Trust. AI & Society, https://doi.org/10.1007/s00146-017-0744-1 (download preprint or read article online).

Abstract

Digital storytelling has become a popular method for curating community, organisational, and individual narratives. Since its beginnings over 20 years ago, projects have sprung up across the globe, where authentic voice is found in the narration of lived experiences. Contributing to a Collective Intelligence for the Common Good, the authors of this paper ask how shared stories can bring impetus to community groups to help identify what they seek to change, and how digital storytelling can be effectively implemented in community partnership projects to enable authentic voices to be carried to other stakeholders in society. The Community Digital Storytelling (CDST) method is introduced as a means for addressing community-of-place issues. There are five stages to this method: preparation, story telling, story digitisation, digital story sense-making, and digital story sharing. Additionally, a Storytelling Cycle of Trust framework is proposed. We identify four trust dimensions as being imperative foundations in implementing community digital media interventions for the common good: legitimacy, authenticity, synergy, and commons. This framework is concerned with increasing the impact that everyday stories can have on society; it is an engine driving prolonged storytelling. From this perspective, we consider the ability to scale up the scope and benefit of stories in civic contexts. To illustrate this framework, we use experiences from the CDST workshop in northern Britain and compare this with a social innovation project in the southern Netherlands.

 

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The Tilburg story of knowledge sharing for social innovation

Last October, I gave an invited talk at the School of Communication and Information, Rutgers University, USA. Topic of my talk was “Knowledge Sharing for Social Innovation: The Dutch Tilburg Regional Case”. I published the slides of my talk in a previous post. In the meantime, however, with the help of the good people of Rutgers’ IT staff, I worked on creating an indexed YouTube version of the video recording that was made of my presentation. In it, you can find the Tilburg story of knowledge sharing for social innovation. It contains the slides combined with my presenting them, plus a very lively Q&A with the audience afterwards. In this YouTube video, you can watch me tell the full story. Click here to get a larger version (handy for reading those crowded slides!).

If you want to jump to a particular topic, see the index below the video.

Jump to:

Earlier, we identified the Tilburg region to be full of social innovations, but still being weak in the knowledge sharing about them. Hopefully, my talk is one of many, many more. Looking forward to learning about your own stories.

The Tilburg University student portal at a glance

Some information on the Tilburg University student portal, which was launched on September 30, 2008:

Students target group page

Students target group page

The Tilburg University web site has dedicated information pages for the various target groups, including students, lecturers, and prospective students. Through the students target group page, students can login to their personal portal. The portal has been implemented in Blackboard, and integrated with its existing Digital Learning Environment. Once logged in, the student sees three tabs: My Study, My University and My Stuff. The portlets (channels or views on applications or information resources) on the portal tabs are by default only, and can be (re)moved by students as they like.

My Study page - part 1

My Study tab – part 1

My Study page - part 2

My Study tab – part 2

My Study page - part 3

My Study tab – part 3

My Study contains study-related portlets. The default portlets on the My Study tab include My Courses, My Course Announcements, My Study Facilities, Webmail Notifier, My Week Schedule, My Schedule Changes, My Exam Schedule, and Language Tools.

My University page - part 1

My University tab – part 1

My University page - part 2

My University tab – part 2

My University tab - part 3

My University tab – part 3

My University-portlets are related to the organizational context in which students study. Depending on the faculty a student is studying at, different faculty-related portlets are presented. The default portlets on the My University tab include Course Catalog, Organization Catalog, a Faculty Hotlist, Faculty News, Tilburg University News, This Week at Tilburg University, Univers News (the university newspaper), University Address Book, My Library Facilities, Library Search, News from the Faculty student associations, Portal News, and My Portal Suggestions.

My Stuff tab

My Stuff tab

The My Stuff tab is empty and can be filled with portlets by students as they like.

Modify content

Modify content

Modify layout

Modify layout

Using standard Blackboard functionality, students can select portlets from an ever growing list and add them to their tabs. This way, they can also modify the layout of their portal environment and portlets.

Student portal launch movie

Student portal launch movie

Communication with stakeholders has always had a very high priority in the project. A suggestion form is available, and suggestions are publicly accessible, and a weblog is used to communicate about the progress of the portal development. To prepare students (and other stakeholders) for the consequences of the changes in functionality, a series of electronic newsletters was published. To draw attention to the student portal, a humorous “all throughout history, mankind struggled with technology” launch movie was produced, together with the Tilburg University theatre sports association Rataplan (click here for the “Making Of”).